The Daily Rind | Your Top Source for The Orchard and Industry News

Working with a Living Legend: Richard Gottehrer

On my very first day at The Orchard almost three years ago, my boss took me around the office in typical Orchard tradition and introduced me to every single person sitting at his or her desk, from our accountants to our developers and everyone in between. Was anyone off limits? …

The Marketplace Presents: Klick Push

If you had the opportunity to get your music featured in more places, why wouldn’t you take it? And if those places were high-engagement areas, it’d really be a no brainer. Well listen up then, because our latest Marketplace partner, Klick Push, has just the thing for you. With access …

Use YouTube Annotations to Create an Album Preview Video

So you’ve got a new album coming out and you want to give fans a taste of what to expect. Try creating an album preview video and uploading it to your YouTube channel! We’ll walk you through how to set this up. Prepare Your Content We’re not going to go …

Become A SoundCloud Master and A Master Of Your Rights On SoundCloud

Between updating their subscription plans and experimenting with more visual profiles (still in early beta), SoundCloud has been on fire lately. ComScore even recently reported that their traffic increased by 26% in one month, making SoundCloud the 8th fastest growing site in the U.S. Though it’s certainly evolved since its launch in Berlin in …

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Welcome, Oleg!

August 20, 2014 Orchard News No Comments

olegrozovIntroducing Oleg Rozov, Client & Marketing Manager, Russia

My name is Oleg, i was born in Moscow in 1984.

I started my day job on MTV Russia and was working as a director on True Life (Russian Version), then I joined Faces&Laces, an interactive exhibition and music show, where I was curating music format and bookings. After that I joined Dream Industries and Zvooq, where I was involved in the product strategy, mostly focused on signing the indie catalogues and label relations.

My passion for music started during the school period, I was involved in Hip Hop and rave subcultures, which were very popular in Russia in the 90s (along with Punk Rock and Metal), when all the new things from the West started flooding our country after the USSR collapsed.

I graduated from Moscow’s Humanitarian Institute of TV and Radio Broadcasting. These were the times I started visiting different raves together with my friends, it was Jungle and House music. UK’s underground scene (early Jungle, UK Hardcore, UK Garage) was something that really drew my attention and I started to buy vinyl records. It was impossible to get music from the Internet back then (as it wasn’t even fully there yet :)), and that is how things became serious for me.

It was 2001 when I started to collect wax ­– that was the end of the Electronic music renaissance in Russia. I began to play in clubs in 2002; in 2004, I hosted my own radio show about UK Garage on Moscow’s first ‘Urban’ radio station, NEXT 105.2 FM (now closed). Later I launched the first ever Dubstep/Garage club night in Russia and CIS called Capital Bass (2006) and brought all the main artists (incl. Scuba, Kode9, Pearson Sound, Skream and many others) to Moscow. In 2012, Capital Bass became a vinyl/digital label as I felt that many interesting things are happening on the local scene and it’s time to push Russian producers and give them a good chance to release their music on vinyl.

My other hobbies include: custom motorcycles, asian culture, fitness, etc.

The Rise of Streaming, Impact on Artists & Labels, and How to Adapt

cloud-musicUnless you don’t work in the music business or you were on Mars for the past year, you’ve heard about it: streaming is on the rise, but unlike downloads which were more or less a transcription of the physical world into digital, streaming introduces totally different paradigms. Let’s have a look at them and their impacts on artists and labels.

Download & Physical = Ownership Model / Streaming = Access Model

When you buy a physical or digital copy of an album, you buy it at a specific price and only one time. Then depending on how much you like the album you bought, you listen to it 2 times or 1000 times. With streaming, you no longer buy an album, but each of your listens (of more than 30s) generates royalties for artists and labels, and these royalties are paid either by advertising if you are on an ad supported model (YouTube, Spotify Freemium, etc.), or by a monthly subscription if you have subscribed to a service.

So in the physical/download world, the main lever is to get more buyers. In the streaming world, while you also want more people to listen to your music, you’re hoping these people listen to your music more often, too.

We all remember the 90’s, when we discovered a really good song on the radio, bought the album without having listened to it and the only worthwhile song from the 8 or 12 tracks was that radio single. In the streaming era, this shouldn’t happen anymore: because you have access to whatever music you want, unless you are dedicated masochist you will theoretically only listen to the music you love. That’s a big difference: even if a hit single can always help build awareness, each of your songs has too be good enough to be listened to repeatedly.

The second big change is you can release songs in the format you want and when you want. You no longer need to have a full album of minimum 30-40 minutes ready; each time you have a new song, you can — and should — put it “live” and build awareness around it.

This strategy makes even more sense for new and developing bands, as they can start to drive revenue with their first songs. Indeed, unlike download and physical revenues, where you see a big peak around release date (X buyers x $10), in the streaming era, even if you can still observe a peak around release due to curiosity/promotion, you should continue to observe pretty decent and regular streams over time (1+1+1+1).

In the download/physical world, release is the end of the process. For streaming, it’s just the beginning. As an artist or label, this translates into quite a big change in your cash flow, especially if you are used to getting substantial physical pre-orders. With streaming, you will need more time to recoup your initial investments, BUT revenues will last longer, and as such, streaming adds value to catalogs on the whole.

To capitalize on this, it’s a good idea to release new songs immediately, followed by remixes and B-sides so you can continuously build your catalog and as such, your revenue long-term.

Playlists and Socials: Sharing Is the New Promo

When speaking of promo, I always picture this: before the Internet, choices came from the top and as a consumer you could only choose between what labels, radio stations, TV stations and stores had selected for you. Now, with both Internet and the growth of streaming, choices are increasingly coming from the bottom — from the fans, through viral sharing, on socials… Of course, you still need people to love and pick your music to bring it to others, and the bigger/more influentials that “dude” is, the better it is for your music; but you don’t necessarily need to wait for the “Big Dude” of the Music Biz anymore. Everyone and anyone can help you spread your music by posting it on Facebook, Twitter, and adding it to their playlists. And who knows, perhaps at the end of the day, the “Big Dude” will listen to your music and like it, too.

One tip on sharing: be emphatic. Think about what you would like to see on socials from your favorite artists and labels, and don’t hesitate to highlight other artists — known or unknown — you like and “tag” them. Perhaps they will also love what you do and return the favor.

To conclude, I’ll leave you with this: Always be sincere and never abandon the music you like to try to please more people. If it’s honest, you’ll find your fan base and it will be more loyal and dedicated for it. Now, welcome to a world of profusion and to the Sharing Economy!

Bridge the Purchasing Gap with GeoRiot

GeoRiotPurchasingGapOur friends at GeoRiot are on a roll – their service keeps getting better and better, all the while still fulfilling a simple promise: getting your fans to the most appropriate storefront for your music, and filling your pockets with a bit of extra cash while they’re at it. Here’s GeoRiot’s CEO, Jesse Lakes, on their latest feature: Genius Links.  

We’ve been fortunate enough to be a guest on The Daily Rind a couple of times, discussing why it doesn’t make sense to use raw links in your marketing, and how you can earn a nice secondary revenue from using the affiliate programs of the world’s largest storefronts. We’ve also talked about how GeoRiot helps you fight “geo-fragmentation” by automatically globalizing your links to help international users purchase in the correct country/region-specific iTunes and Amazon storefronts.

Today we want to introduce another way that GeoRiot helps you earn even more from every link by not only solving the issue of geo-fragmentation, but also helping you bridge something we call The Purchasing Gap (dun dun duuuun!). We define the Purchasing Gap as the rift between the product you’re promoting and where each individual customer wants to purchase.

Simply put, if you’re promoting your music not only internationally, but with multiple stores, such as iTunes, Amazon, Google Play, etc, you can run into issues with getting every user to the destination where they’re most likely to buy your music. People listening to your tunes through their Android phones or tablets can’t directly buy from iTunes. iPad users probably don’t want to go to Google Play — they’ll want to view and purchase your music straight from iTunes. Mixing in factors such as geography, desktop computers with different operating systems, and promotional dates, can make managing your links terrifyingly complicated very fast.

GeoRiot has your back. We’ve developed a new feature that makes bridging that Purchasing Gap seamless and easy. We call them Genius Links. Built on top of our links that automagically localize and affiliate, Genius Links allow you to create additional custom scenarios for each of your links to route specific traffic to the destination with the highest chance of conversion.

What this means is that you can decide where a click goes based off a fan’s device type, operating system, country, or even when the link was clicked.

… Continue Reading

Freeloader Friday: Jessica Hernandez & the Deltas, Allo Darlin’, Afrikan Boy, Amp Live, Raul Midón, Laurel, Big Freedia, Code Orange & Inspiral Carpets

August 15, 2014 Freeloader Friday No Comments

Jessica Hernandez & the Deltas - Secret EvilIt is a fine Summer Friday here at The Orchard’s office in New York. We’ve got our groove on thanks to Diana’s speakers, our bellies are nice and full after eating Sarah’s homemade cheddar-jalapeño scones, and our weekends are so close to beginning! But, before we all head out and about, here’s the latest and greatest in music from the week.

What’dya know, it’s almost that time — time for Jessica Hernandez & the Deltas to release their long-awaited album! And along with that very special date (happening next week), they’ve got their whole record available for streaming. It’s wild, it’s jazzy, it’s alluring and bewitching. This lady’s got some kind of wonderful in those smoky vocals, and her band adds just as much fervor with their lush rhythm.

For this week’s track premieres, there’s Allo Darlin’s Indie Pop starlet of a track: the usual cute happiness replaced by a boppy melancholia (still equally as charming); Afrikan Boy’s Nigerian Afrobeat, referencing shoplifting and getting past immigration officers; Minnesota’s initially chilled-out soundscape remix of Amp Live’s track that turns into a rager; and the collaborative outcome from legendary Bill Withers and Raul Midón, a smooth, Spanish-guitar groove.

And then, of course, there’re the music videos. Laurel takes her viewers on a woeful stroll under a night sky, Big Freedia goes into a dance and glow stick frenzy with her audience, Code Orange gets cultish and Inspiral Carpets rock and roll in the middle of a monastery.

That about wraps it up here. Make sure you check out all these fabulous music goodies from the week, and enjoy your next two fundays!

Jessica Hernandez & the Deltas: Full album stream via WSJ
Secret Evil out August 19 on Instant Records

Allo Darlin’: “Romance and Adventure” track premiere via Pitchfork
We Come from the Same Place out October 7 on Slumberland Records

Afrikan Boy: “Lidl” track premiere via NoiseTrade
The ABCD out August 18 on YAM Records

Amp Live: “Penny Nickel Dime (Minnesota Remix)” track premiere via Earmilk
Headphone Concerto out now on Plug Research

Raul Midon: “Mi Amigo Cubano” track premiere via USA Today
Don’t Hesitate out September 30th on Mack Avenue

Laurel: “Shells” music video premiere via Vevo
To the Hills EP out now on Next Time Records

Big Freedia: “Mo Azz” music video premiere via YouTube
Just Be Free out now on Queen Diva Music

Code Orange: “Dreams in Inertia” music video premiere via Fangoria
I Am King out September 2 on Deathwish

Inspiral Carpets: “Spitfire” music video premiere via The Guardian
The Inspiral Carpets out September 29 on Cherry Red Records

Get Your Fix of Sufi & Ghazal Music on Spotify

Sufi_Ghazal_SpotifyCoverThe Orchard and Times Music have engaged in an unprecedented campaign to actively showcase and promote Sufi & Ghazal music from the Indian subcontinent.

Servicing a huge demand for these two genres in the US and UK, Times Music has put together their Top 100 Sufi & Ghazal songs, thereby offering their listeners the very best of both genres from within their repertoire.

If you don’t know, Sufi music is the devotional music of the Sufis, inspired by the works of Sufi poets like Rumi, Hafiz, Bulleh Shah and Khwaja Ghulam Farid. It’s not just about entertainment, but rather about spirituality. Its powerful lyrics talk about achieving divinity by spreading love and harmony. A Ghazal is a poetic expression of pain from loss or separation and the beauty of love in spite of that pain. Ghazals have proved to be capable of a variety of expressions around these central themes, traditionally invoking melancholy, love, longing and metaphysical questions. Ghazals are often sung by Iranian, Afghan, Pakistani and Indian musicians. This playlist features world renowned artists like Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, The Sabri Brothers, Ghulam Ali, Mehdi Hassan and many more…

“Sufi, Fusion and Ghazal are today’s most progressive forms of music from the Indian subcontinent and Times Music has witnessed a surge of listeners in these genres from the US / UK markets over the last couple of years,” shares Mandar Thakur, COO of Times Music. “Times Music is quite excited to present this amazing collection of Sufi and Ghazal music to consumers through this unique opportunity via The Orchard and Spotify.”

The campaign for this special playlist is running now through the end of the month of August. During that time, you might find the playlist on some of Times Music‘s high-profile online properties, like the Times of India E-Paper and IndiaTimes.com, and if you’re a Spotify freemium user, look out for the cool audio and visual ads we’ve put together to promote the playlist.

Of course, it will be available for your ears long after the promotion ends and will be updated regularly by the label, so be sure to follow it to stay in the loop! And now, for your listening pleasure:

About The Orchard

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